Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer-- predevelopment to 1991 by T. J. McGrath

Cover of: Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer-- predevelopment to 1991 | T. J. McGrath

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Open-File Reports [distributor] in Lincoln, Neb, Denver, Colo .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Aquifers -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • Groundwater -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • High Plains Aquifer

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesWater level changes in the High Plains aquifer-- predevelopment to 1991
Statementby Timothy McGrath and Jack T. Dugan
ContributionsDugan, Jack T, Geological Survey (U.S.)
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14716148M

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WATER-LEVEL CHANGES IN THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER--PREDEVELOPMENT TO by Timothy McGrath and Jack T. Dugan ABSTRACT Regional variability in water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and WyomingCited by: 5.

WATER-LEVEL CHANGES IN THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER-- PREDEVELOPMENT TO by Jack T. Dugan and Donald E. Schild ABSTRACT Changes in water levels in the High PlainsCited by: 7.

High Plains Aquifer Water-Level Monitoring Study Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer—Predevelopment to By Timothy McGrath and Jack T. Dugan. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report Lincoln, Nebraska Abstract.

Regional variability in water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from large regional differences in climate, soils, land use, and ground-water withdrawals for irrigation.

From the beginning of significant development of the High Plains aquifer for irrigation tosubstantial.

Get this from a library. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to [T J McGrath; Jack T Dugan; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from differences in recharge from precipitation and ground-water withdrawals for irrigation.

From the beginning of irrigation development () towater levels declined in several areas, and exceeded feet in parts of the Central. Figure 1. Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer, to The area-weighted average water level in the High Plains (table 1) declined feet from to about foot annually.

This compares to feet from predevelopment () to about foot annually. High Plains Aquifer Water-Level Monitoring Study Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer--Predevelopment to By Jack T.

Dugan and Donald E. Schild. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report Lincoln, Nebraska Abstract. Detailed Description. High Plains aquifer water-level changes, predevelopment (about ) to Figure 1 from USGS SIR Details. Image Dimensions: x   The U.S.

Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two separate periods: from – the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development – toand from to for computing subsequent water level changes, which in this case is provided by the predevelopment water level map described below.

We also use a different interpolation technique and additional postprocessing steps. Water level measurements from the High Plains Aquifer, spanning from towere obtained from the Size: 3MB. (A3) Supplemental water-level change data used to substantiate the map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about ) to (B1) Spatial data set of mapped water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to (B2) Water-level change data used to map water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer, to The High Plains aquifer underlies one of the major agricultural areas in the world in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming.

Nearly 30 percent of the ground water used for irriga-tion in the United States is pumped from the High. You searched for: All Fields (("high plains" OR ) AND (aquifer OR watershed OR hydro OR model OR gage OR csrees OR compet) NOT (texas OR southern OR northern)) Remove constraint All Fields: (("high plains" OR ) AND (aquifer OR watershed OR hydro OR model OR gage OR csrees OR compet) NOT (texas OR southern OR northern)) Format Book OR Microfilm OR Map.

The High Plains aquifer underlies million acres (, square miles) in parts of eight States—Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of substantial irrigation with groundwater in the aquifer area.

This report presents water-level changes in the High Cited by: Dugan, J. T., Schild, E. Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer - Predevelopment to (WRIR). 55 pp., size " x 11". Description: Sections wiht illustrations showing estimated average potential recharge and consumptive irriga.

The High Plains aquifer extends from south of about 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from about 96 degrees 30 minutes to degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies aboutsquare miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming.

This digital data set is the water-level measurements from 7, wells measured in. The Ogallala Aquifer (oh-guh-LAH-luh) is a shallow water table aquifer surrounded by sand, silt, clay, and gravel located beneath the Great Plains in the United States.

One of the world's largest aquifers, it underlies an area of approximatelysq mi (, km 2) in portions of eight states (South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas). The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains Aquifer.

The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer in two separate periods: from –the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development–toand to The area-weighted, average water-level changes in the aquifer were an overall decline of feet from predevelopment toand a decline of foot from –   A new report by the U.S.

Geological Survey (USGS) describes changes that have taken place in the High Plains aquifer from the time that significant ground-water pumping began in the ’s to the year The results show a six percent decrease in the volume of water stored in the High Plains (or Ogallala) aquifer.

Underlying portions of eight states, including Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska. This report presents water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from the time before substantial groundwater irrigation development had occurred (about and termed “predevelopment” in.

McGrath, T. (Timothy J.): PIPECAR, version a microcomputer program for the structural analysis and design of circular and horizontal elliptical reinforced concrete pipe culverts:.

Source: USGS. The USGS post High Plains Aquifer Groundwater Levels Continue to Decline (6/16/17) summarizes the results from the USGS report Water-Level and Recoverable Water in Storage Changes, High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to and – Intotal recoverable water in storage in the aquifer was about billion acre-feet, which is an overall decline of about.

Area-weighted, average water-level changes for the aquifer were declines of feet from tofeet from tofeet from toand foot from to Estimated changes in water in storage were declines of million acre-feet from tomillion acre-feet from tomillion Authors: Brenda K.

Densmore, Kris D. Lund. The High Plains aquifer, which includes the well-known Ogallala aquifer, is the most important water source for much of western and central Kansas (fig.

1), supplying 70% to 80% of the water used by Kansans each day. Water from the High Plains aquifer supports the. WATER LEVEL CHANGES IN THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER PREDEVELOPMENT TO MAGUIRE USGS.

Area-weighted Average Water Level Change Predevelopment to Colorado Kansas Nebraska New Mexico Oklahoma South Dakota Texas Wyoming High Plains A large imbalance between recharge and water withdrawal has caused vital regions of the High Plains Aquifer (HPA) to experience significant declines in storage.

A new predevelopment map coupled with a synthesis of annual water levels demonstrates that aquifer storage has declined by approximately km 3 since the s, a 15% larger decline. Ogallala/Edwards Trinity (High Plains) Water Level Summary (PDF) Dockum Water Level Summary (PDF) Irrigation Assessment Results (PDF) AIM Round 1 Report (PDF) HPWD discontinued its printed water level report in Edwards-Trinity (High Plains) Aquifer Quick Facts.

Minor aquifer that underlies southern and eastern counties in the HPWD. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily due to downward leakage from the younger Ogallala Aquifer. Freshwater saturated thickness in the aquifer averages feet. Water quality is generally slightly saline.

The High Plains Water-Level Monitoring Study (HPWLMS) is a program through the United States Geological Survey to provide biannual reports on the changes in the High Plains Aquifer throughout the eight states that overlie the aquifer.

Farmed Out: Overpumping Threatens to Deplete U.S. High Plains Groundwater The former dust bowl’s lone water source could run dry without a change in. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment to and to U.S.

Geological Survey Fact Sheet FS, 6 p. McLaughlin, D. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer: Predevelopment to Water Resources Investigation Report 91– Water Resources Investigation Report 91– Lincoln: U.S. Geological by: 3. Figure 8 and Figure 9 compares the High Plains aquifer system’s predevelopment saturated thickness to that of present showing considerable drops in areas of the Ogallala in western Kansas (USGS, ).

This once again shows the huge variance in hydrologic aspects that can be seen in a large aquifer system like the High Plains. Groundwater-Level Changes in Nebraska Archive The maps below depict groundwater level changes in Nebraska and are organized by year. If you have questions about the maps, contact Aaron Young, Groundwater Resources Coordinator, Conceptual Model for the High Plains Aquifer Water-level data f wells were retrieved from TWDB groundwater database.

Groundwater Conservation Districts. likely be revised where they are significantly different from storage changes calculated from water levels. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer: Predevelopment to USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report Reston, Va.: U.S.

Geological Sur- vey. The High Plains Aquifer. The High Plains Aquifer system consists of Tertiary sedimentary rock, dominantly sandstone and gravel (Figure 45), eroded from the ancient Rocky Mountains and deposited in the Tertiary period (from about 31 to 5 million years ago).

The Ogallala Formation is the primary aquifer unit in the system. High Plains Aquifer SystemGroundwater Availability Model (GAM). In Julythe Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) contracted with INTERA, Inc.

to develop a groundwater availability model (GAM) for the High Plains Aquifer System (Ogallala Aquifer, Dockum Aquifer, Edwards-Trinity (High Plains) Aquifer, and Rita Blanca Aquifer).The project was completed and delivered in.

Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to, andand Change in Water in Storage, Predevelopment to Law, College of Nebraska Law: Mission Statement and Strategic Plan.The Ogallala, or High Plains, Aquifer is a porous body of complex sediments and sedimentary rock formations that conducts groundwater and yields significant quantities of water to wells and springs.

The principal sediments and rocks of the aquifer range in age from 33 million years old to sediments being deposited today, but the majority is.The High Plains Aquifer: A Kansas Perspective Jim Butler, Don Whittemore, and Brownie Wilson Kansas Geological Survey University of Kansas AGI Critical Issues Forum Addressing Changes in Regional Groundwater Resources: Lessons from the High Plains Aquifer Golden, CO Octo

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